Nadir (on the right) and Juraci (on the left) were born June 2, 1957, at Terra Nova, Bahia, Brazil. Their mother Maria dos Santos was alarmed by the unusual birth and left her daughters at the Climerio de Oliverras maternity hospital in Salvador. There, they were adopted by gynecologist Adeo Dar and took on the name of the hospital as their surname. At the clinic, the sisters learned to speak, read, write, and walk. Unlike the famous Tocci twins who were joined in the same manner, Nadir and Juraci could stand and walk without aid.

Juraci and Nadir were quite different, as is typical of conjoined twins. Juraci, who stood straighter than her sister and controlled the actions on the left half of the body, was talkative and energetic, while Nadir, who leaned at a precarious angle and controlled the limbs on the right, was quiet and introverted. The two slept at different times and became ill separately. Physically, they shared kidneys, a liver, a spleen and a single genitourinary tract. A 1964 article in Pic magazine confusingly states that the twins also had male (XY) chromosomes, despite being genitally female, which is unlikely but certainly possible.

On April 3, 1974, at 11 p.m., Nadir, who had always been the weaker twin, became very ill with acute pulmonary edema. An emergency operation to separate the twins was proposed, but Juraci refused. According to their adoptive father, "Juraci was furious and told me repeatedly that she did not want a separation if it would kill her sister. 'I want to die with Nadir,' she said." The same evening, the twins were rushed to a hospital, where Nadir died. "Juraci knew at once that it meant death for her too. She just looked at me and smiled. She was not afraid and not nervous. Ten minutes after Nadir died, Juraci also died." The twins were buried in a white coffin on April 4 at Cemiterio do Campo Santo in the city of Salvador. The people of Bahia flocked to the funeral of the 16-year-old twins, mourning the sisters who had attained the status of local heroes in their short lifetime.

(Dr. Dar's quotes from The Gleaner, "Love Unto Death", April 6, 1974)

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